Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses by Elizabeth P. Cramer

Cover of: Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses | Elizabeth P. Cramer

Published by Harrington Park Press .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Gay studies (Gay men),
  • Sociology,
  • Higher,
  • Social Science,
  • Education / Teaching,
  • United States,
  • Heterosexism,
  • Gay Studies,
  • Homophobia in higher education

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages274
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8614335M
ISBN 101560233044
ISBN 109781560233046

Download Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses

This book presents an integrated approach toward changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on contemporary college campuses. From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the Format: Paperback.

This book presents an integrated approach toward changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on contemporary college campuses.

From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the classroom. This book tackles a wide. This book presents an integrated approach toward changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on contemporary college campuses.

From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the classroom. From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the classroom.

This book tackles a This book presents an integrated approach toward changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on 4/5. From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the classroom.

This book tackles a wide variety of subjects including academic freedom, diversity training, nontraditional families, and religion, each of which plays an integral part in the 4/5(1). Get this from a library. Addressing homophobia and heterosexism on college campuses. [Elizabeth P Cramer;] -- Cramer (social work, Virginia Commonwealth U.) presents 19 papers that explore ways to address homophobia and heterosexism on college campuses.

Separate sections look at campus-wide programs and. Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses. Cramer, Elizabeth P., Ed. The chapters in this collection present an approach to changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on college by: Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses, edited by Cramer, and copublished as the Journal of Lesbian Studies,6(3/4), provides a valuable contribution to.

Allies in the Struggle. Journal of Lesbian Studies: Vol. 6, Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses, pp. Students at a number of US universities have spoken out about sexual assault, racism and homophobia on campuses.

Photograph: Sam Frost L ike many universities, Dartmouth College. while addressing the changes new technologies have brought to LGBT students.

Cramer, Elizabeth P. Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses. Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park Press. This book should be of interest to librarians and other academics interested in addressing issues of homophobia on college campuses.

cultural homophobia (heterosexism) refers to societal values and “norms”that privilege heterosexuality over all other forms of gender expression and sexual orientation. Understanding Sexuality University campuses are a reflection of the wider society.

Indeed, part of a university’s strength is the diversity of all its members. Like other. thrive on campus as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and/or questioning student.

Including tons of student testimonials and dozens of parent tips, the Gay and Lesbian Guide to College Life offers no-nonsense guidance to LGBT students, their families, and allies on how to make the most of their college experience [Publisher synopsis].

With former undergraduate students Lina Baroudi and S. Collins, Lovaas wrote “Transcending heteronormativity in the classroom: Using queer and critical pedagogies to alleviate trans-anxieties” for the Journal of Lesbian Studies (); it was simultaneously published in Addressing homophobia and heterosexism on college campuses (Haworth.

Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses, by Elizabeth P. Cramer, Ed. Our first book group was small but very energizing.

We read sections of the above book and met for some very interesting and compelling discussions that lead to some positive growth for our little group. Published in E.

Cramer (Ed.), Addressing homophobia and heterosexism on college campuses (pp. Binghamton, NY: Haworth. [Contents of book also published simultaneously as Vol.

6, No. 3/4 of the Journal of Lesbian Studies.] Used by permission. This book presents an integrated approach toward changing attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff on contemporary college campuses.

From Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses you can learn specific classroom techniques for handling homophobia and heterosexism in the. (). From Homophobia and Heterosexism to Heteronormativity. Journal of Lesbian Studies: Vol. 6, Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses, pp.

Attend workshops on homophobia, heterosexism and transgender issues Read books, see films and attend special events focused on LGBT issues Talk with lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender friends, relatives, co-workers or fellow students about their experience Learn about LGBT people who have made significant contributions to society I can recognize my own.

Key Difference – Homophobia vs Heterosexism Homophobia and heterosexism are two terms between which a key difference can be identified.

Homophobia is the hatred and fear of homosexuality and sexism is the idea that heterosexuals are superior to others. Although college campuses aim to be spaces that promote the growth and development of all students, extant research indicates that sexual minority students often feel unsafe on campus, and some are harassed and subjected to violence,28 As this study and others show, heterosexual students may also be mistreated on campus,31 Regardless of.

women in college residence halls: Implications for addressing homophobia and heterosexism. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 6(), Evans, N.

J., & Herriott, T. Freshmen impressions: How investigating the campus climate for LGBT students affected four freshmen students. Journal of College Student Development, 45(3), The experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in college residence halls: Implications for addressing homophobia and heterosexism.

In E. Cramer (Ed.), Addressing homophobia and heterosexism on college campuses (pp. The experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in college residence halls: Implications for addressing homophobia and heterosexism. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 6 (3/4), Demographic Characteristic: Undergraduate student, Queer-spectrum, Lesbian, Bisexual, Women.

Sausa, Lydia A. “Updating College and University Campus Policies: Meeting the Needs of Trans Students, Staff, and Faculty.” In Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College Campuses. Edited by Elizabeth P. Cramer. Harrington Park Press, Books and Articles. Beemyn, Brett.

“Serving the Needs of Transgender College Students.”. Campus Pride represents the only national nonprofit (c)(3) organization for student leaders and campus groups working to create a safer college environment for LGBT students.

The organization is a volunteer-driven network "for" and "by" student leaders. Homophobia is fear and hatred of people who are attracted to the same sex. It can be directed toward others or internalized. Transphobia, likewise, is fear and hatred of gender-variant people. Violence, homelessness, police brutality, chronic underemployment, and poverty disproportionately affect transgender people.

Homophobia, a form of heterosexism, refers both to "unreasoning fear of or antipathy towards homosexuals and homosexuality" and to "behavior based on such a feeling".

Heterosexism, however, more broadly denotes the "system of ideological thought that makes heterosexuality the sole norm to follow for sexual practices".

[13]. The purpose of Challenging Homophobia and Heterosexism: A K Curriculum Resource Guide is to assist educators, administrators, and school communities K in challenging homophobia and heterosexism and to promote equity for sexual orientation and gender identity. Ideally, educational institutions ought to be environments supportive and celebratory of all differences.

In striving to create such a community on a college campus or university campus, it is important to acknowledge factors that hinder and prevent their existence. This paper will define heterosexism and homophobia and examine their manifestations on campus.

Sanlo, Ronni, L., ed. Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students: A Handbook for Faculty and Administrators. Greenwood Press, Sausa, Lydia A. “Updating College and University Campus Policies: Meeting the Needs of Trans Students, Staff, and Faculty.” In Addressing Homophobia and Heterosexism on College.

Heterosexism and homophobia are acquired early in life, starting in primary school (Plummer, ). Homophobia, instead of being a clinical phobia or one associated with a compelling desire to avoid the feared object despite realizing that the fear is unreasonable, could consist of distress that spreads from the original source to related objects or interactions.

Join Dr. Heather Hackman for a compelling and lively talk addressing equity and social justice on college campuses. Hackman has been teaching and training on social justice issues since and was a professor in the Department of Human Relations and Multicultural Education at St.

Cloud State University in St Cloud, Minnesota for 12 years before she began focusing full time on consulting. institutions and (b) psychological heterosexism, a college campus to determine the extent to which encompasses individual attitudes and which campus climate impacted gay identity behaviors.

"Cultural heterosexism is like the air development. We hypothesized. Faculty who run the classes call them "flip courses." Instead of focusing on the victims of social bullying as at-risk kids in her homophobia course, she said, "we talk about homophobia as problematic, and how homophobia and heterosexism play out on elementary, middle school, high school and college campuses.".

Campus sexual assault is the sexual assault, including rape, of a student while attending an institution of higher learning, such as a college or university. The victims of such assaults are more frequently female, but any gender can be victimized.

Estimates of sexual assault, which vary based on definitions and methodology, generally find that somewhere between 19–27% of college women and 6.

Safe Zones serve as a source of support and information, free of judgment and hostility. They display the Safe Zone logo to indicate that they have completed Safe Zone training and have signed a contract expressing their commitment to Safe Zone policies and procedures.

Safe Zones are also expected to challenge assumptions and prejudices related to sexual orientation and gender and to address. Muñoz, S. M., & Vigil, D. Interrogating racist nativist microaggressions and campus climate: How undocumented and DACA college students experience institutional legal violence in l of Diversity in Higher Education.

Former athlete and coach Pat Griffin makes a provocative and impassioned call for attention to a topic too long avoided by women's sports advocates.

In Strong Women, Deep Closets, she provides a critical analysis of discrimination and prejudice against lesbians in book is the first to explore the lesbian sporting experience as well as examine homophobia and heterosexism in women's sport. Many students have served as educators and activists on campus over the years regarding issues of homophobia and heterosexism.

Those who dedicated many hours of their lives to ensuring the establishment of the Resource Center in the spring of include Rachel Chase '05, Grant Hogan '07, Gael Johns '10, Aimee Martin '07, Candyce Young-Fields.

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